Category Archives: Clinical Education

Compendium for teaching professional level PT content (neuro focus)

From an email I received earlier this month.  If you are an instructor this is a great resource for neuro-related coursework ideas.

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The Academy of Neurologic Physical Therapy is pleased to announce the
release of the updated *“Compendium for Teaching Professional Level
Physical Therapy Content, v. 2016”*. This compendium is an update of the
previous compendium published in 2000 and edited by Margaret Schenkman PhD,
PT and Kathleen Gill-Body, MS, PT, NCS.

The purpose of the Compendium is to provide examples of high quality
teaching and learning strategies that have been developed and refined by
the contributors. Some activities include detailed patient cases and/or
grading rubrics, which can be difficult and time-consuming to write. These
will be useful for novice faculty who are seeking innovative ways to
deliver content. In addition, experienced educators will find new ideas
and alternative teaching strategies.

The compendium is online, and open access
http://www.neuropt.org/education/compendium. Activities may be searched by
elements of the patient management model, by pathology, or by type of
teaching activity. *Activities can be downloaded individually, and
educators may freely adapt or adopt the learning activities while providing
recognition to the Academy and the original authors*.

The Compendium co-chairs would like to recognize the hard work of authors,
editors, and Academy leaders in developing this resource. We hope you find
it useful in planning your curriculum!

*Jody Cormack, PT, DPT, MS Ed, NCS*
* Sue Perry, PT, DPT, MS*
Compendium v.2016 Co-chairs

Sometimes the best teachers are where you least expect

I am clinical faculty for a local PT program for their ICE (Integrated Clinical Education).  During the a student evaluation last month, one of my students recommended that I involve the patient during my instruction and education to students as she felt the patient (who is to be the center of what we do) is left out on the periphery.  Wow.  Best feedback I’ve received thus far.  I came up with an idea how to implement it for next year.

I’m also a CI this summer with a 2:1 model for first-year students.  As I was asking a student what he observed about a patient transfer, explaining what I saw, and working on ideas of what we could do, the patient said “hey, I’m right here – talk to me!”  Ouch.  So now I’m prefacing my interactions with students to the patient saying I’ll be talking PT jargon to the students, but they will be explaining it back to you in non-technical terms.  In doing this a) we are involving the patient (and they know what is going on) and b) the students get to practice patient-friendly language (if you ever get stuck try the rubber ducky idea).

I love being a physio and a teacher, and also a student.  While I do miss academia, you can learn anywhere if you are open to it, and bettering yourself and others in the process.

 

How Can You Improve Patient Interactions?

153570089_bb99d7108c_mHave you ever been a patient (for any provider, not just PT) and had a really great or a really bad experience?  What was the key to that experience for you?  For me, it was the interaction with the provider.  I’ve contemplated switching providers because of an interaction where I felt like a number, that my concerns were minimized and derided, and that his time was much more valuable than mine.

I received the most recent PTJ yesterday.  A few articles grabbed my attention, including “What Influences Patient-Therapist Interactions in Musculoskeletal Physical Therapy? Qualitative Systematic Review and Meta-Synthesis” (O’Keeffee M, Cullinane P, Hurley J, et al; Phys Ther 2016; 96: 609-622).  It reminds me a lot of the PTJ article by Hush and colleagues from 2011 entitled “Patient Satisfaction with Musculoskeletal Physical Therapy Care: a Systematic Review” which is one I have my students read.

The authors identified four themes in their review: PT interpersonal and communication skills (active listening, empathy, friendliness, encouragement, confidence but not overconfidence, and non-verbal communication), PT practice skills (patient education – a big one for patients, and PT expertise and training), individualized patient centered care (individualized, and taking patient opinion and preference into consideration) and organization and environmental factors (time, flexibility).

The results aren’t all that surprising, but they bear repeating to ourselves as providers; I would argue while both articles examine this in light of musculoskeletal PT, it very likely applies across all specialties and settings. Do positive interactions enhance adherence and give better outcomes?  No evidence on this yet, but it would make sense especially for self-efficacy. I think I do pretty well in my interactions, but I think I’ll focus on my listening and patient education.  What can you work on to improve patient satisfaction and possibly their adherence and outcomes?

Photo credit: X-Factor by Pierre Metivier.

Thoughts on Physical Therapist Education – Day 1 of ELC

I am attending the Educational Leadership Conference (ELC), a conference by the Education Section of the APTA. While the keynote was interesting (calls for including business education in the curriculum and modifying/ removing non-essentials, and challenges to ask “what if…” to improve various aspects of education – gave me some good ideas), my biggest interest was a presentation on implementing the 2:1 model.

I did the 2:1 model for the first time this summer, and I have to say I’m a definite proponent of it.  The speakers reported that on the academic side they were able to increase from 30 to 60 students with fewer clinical sites, and on the clinical side productivity, number of patients, and units billed all increased (they will be presenting a poster at CSM, so check it out).  Their presentation was largely a story of how a school and clinical site can work together to implement the idea.  It was interesting to hear the thought processes, the planning, and the implementation of the 2:1 (for me, I jumped right in to help out St. Kate’s and talked briefly with those who had done it before).  I picked up some good ideas I plan to implement next time from the speakers and from the audience, including ensuring coverage plans in advance (easy enough to do, but I want to solidify it beforehand), have a list of questions for the 2nd student to be thinking of and give feedback to the treating student, and use the time the students are working on a project for me to work on the CPI’s (doing two isn’t bad if you do weekly forms and use the CPI language on them).

Tomorrow I’ll attend a Clinical Education SIG Forum and a presentation on “Culture Change in Physical Therapy Education” (two sessions recommended based on my involvement with the National Consortium of Clinical Educators), and possibly “Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety” or platforms on “Innovations in Teaching.”